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Adjusting the Narrative: The Differences Between Hemp & Marijuana Explained

Did you grow up the 60s and 70s at the height of the hippie movement? If so, you may have a tainted outlook on hemp and how it differs from marijuana plants. There are nearly 800 strain varieties of cannabis, each with a different chemical composition. Marijuana refers to specific cannabis variations that contain the THC chemical compound, which not all do. Ultimately, cannabis and marijuana are not the same and shouldn’t necessarily be used interchangeably although they often are and this is unlikely to change. That being said, hemp and cannabis do actually mean the same thing as hemp is the Latin term for cannabis, but the term marijuana is not applicable for all hemp or cannabis plants, only those with particular chemical make-ups.

 

Cannabis, Hemp & Marijuana: Terminology Breakdown

 

Cannabis: Cannabis is a plant in the cannabaceae flowering plant family. Both hemp and marijuana fall under the “cannabis” terminology, but the breakdown does stem deeper and needs some elaboration. Some ingredients in cannabis plants are psychoactive, but not all are, so depending on the cannabis plant specifications, the chemical makeup of the plant will vary. The potency and balance of compounds depend on the growth and processing methods, so some cannabis plants will contain higher levels of THC, which should be referred to as marijuana, while others will have the 2018 Farm Bill approved amount of THC being less than 0.3% s and can be classified as hemp plants.

 

Hemp: It’s a common mistake that is often made, but hemp is not actually weed. Hemp is a variety of a cannabis sativa plant that can be separated into female and male plants. Hemp plants have been used for millenniums for a variety of reasons, including the production of fibers from plant stems, proteins from plant seeds and oils or ingestibles from the leaves and flowers. Hemp plants boast a range of cannabinoids, most popularly known being CBD and sometimes including THC. THC is capable of creating intoxicating effects, but with the regulations in place in the US regarding hemp cultivation, the amount of THC allowed in hemp plants is below 0.3%. Although some hemp strains do have THC in them, the extraction and processing methods used to create a hemp-based product can isolate or remove the unwanted cannabinoids present. This means finding CBD products with zero THC is possible, and an ideal choice for those concerned with consuming anything psychoactive related.

 

Marijuana: Marijuana is yet another variation of cannabis plants, the most potent in THC. Although hemp and marijuana are both biologically classified as cannabis plants, there are differences. Again, the level of THC a plant produces is what differentiates hemp from the intoxicating variety of cannabis plant, marijuana. Legally, if a cannabis plant produces over 0.3% THC in its chemical makeup, it is considered a marijuana variation. If a plant contains less than 0.3% THC and any given amount of CBD, it considered hemp instead.

 

CBD Products That Are THC-Free:

 

There are products on the market, catered specifically to those who don’t wish to consume any THC or get the psychoactive components often associated with cannabis and hemp alike. Products that have been extracted to isolate the non-psychoactive cannabinoids like CBD can offer a natural alternative with their therapeutic properties that work with the human body’s endocannabinoid system. Some of these products are even catered specifically for seniors or those who grew up in the “reefer madness” era in America. Blue Ribbon Hemp is one of these companies, cultivating and producing hemp CBD products that have been isolated to contain no trace of amounts of THC. If you are interested in trying out CBD, but vehemently want to avoid THC, Blue Ribbon Hemp is a great place to start. When looking for a high-quality CBD oil for seniors, turn to Blue Ribbon Hemp for a quality product that is legit and has zero THC.

 

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabaceae

https://weedmaps.com/learn/the-plant/what-is-cannabis/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5345356/

https://www.nap.edu/resource/24625/Cannabis_committee_conclusions.pdf

https://sips.cals.cornell.edu/extension-outreach/industrial-hemp/

https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/R44742.pdf

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/246392

https://www.agriculture.senate.gov/2018-farm-bill

 

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